Chivalry


Chivalry
Chivalry is as much about the skills and manners of a warrior class as with a literature derived from the deeds of those warriors, but presented in an idealised fashion which returned to define the manners of the warriors. Chivalry was a collocation of qualities made into a coherent ideal: skill and courage, and a craving for glory or fame acquired through knightly skills and its necessary courage. Tournaments were the place to acquire and hone skills. They were also places where a great deal of money could be made with sufficient courage and skill, as William Marshal and others did. Chivalry required that the knight be courteous and gallant towards ladies. He must be generous with a defeated enemy; his word must be his bond, for should he break his oath or parole, his name and glory would be fatally sullied. In October 1326, Sir Hugh Despenser was executed, having been one of the most influential men at Edward Il's court; he was said to have dishonoured the order of chivalry. As part of his sentence it was ordered that Despenser be hanged in a *surcoat *quartered with his arms and that afterwards his arms should be destroyed for ever.

Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. .

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Chivalry — • Considered from three points of view: the military, the social, and the religious Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Chivalry     Chivalry      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Chivalry — Chiv al*ry, n. [F. chevalerie, fr. chevalier knight, OF., horseman. See {Chevalier}, and cf. {Cavalry}.] 1. A body or order of cavaliers or knights serving on horseback; illustrious warriors, collectively; cavalry. His Memphian chivalry. Milton.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • chivalry — late 13c., from O.Fr. chevalerie knighthood, chivalry, nobility, cavalry, art of war, from chevaler knight, from M.L. caballarius horseman, from L. caballus (see CAVALIER (Cf. cavalier)). From mounted knight, meaning stretched 14c. to courtly… …   Etymology dictionary

  • chivalry — index consideration (sympathetic regard), courtesy Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • chivalry — [n] valor, gallantry courage, courtesy, courtliness, fairness, politeness, valiance; concept 633 Ant. cowardice, fear, humbleness, humility …   New thesaurus

  • chivalry — ► NOUN 1) the medieval knightly system with its religious, moral, and social code. 2) the combination of qualities expected of an ideal knight, especially courage, honour, courtesy, justice, and a readiness to help the weak. 3) courteous… …   English terms dictionary

  • chivalry — [shiv′əl rē] n. [ME & OFr chevalerie < chevaler, knight < cheval, horse < L caballus: see CAVALRY] 1. a group of knights or gallant gentlemen 2. the medieval system of knighthood 3. the noble qualities a knight was supposed to have, such …   English World dictionary

  • Chivalry — For other uses, see Chivalry (disambiguation). Chivalry is a term related to the medieval institution of knighthood which has an aristocratic military origin of individual training and service to others. Chivalry was also the term used to refer… …   Wikipedia

  • chivalry — /shiv euhl ree/, n., pl. chivalries for 6. 1. the sum of the ideal qualifications of a knight, including courtesy, generosity, valor, and dexterity in arms. 2. the rules and customs of medieval knighthood. 3. the medieval system or institution of …   Universalium

  • chivalry — [[t]ʃɪ̱vəlri[/t]] 1) N UNCOUNT Chivalry is polite, kind, and unselfish behaviour, especially by men towards women. Marie seemed to revel in his old fashioned chivalry. Syn: gallantry 2) N UNCOUNT In the Middle Ages, chivalry was the set of rules… …   English dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.